February 25, 2018

Bumble Flower Beetle

Bumble flower beetle (E.C. Burkness & T.L. Galvan, U of MN)

Bumble flower beetle (E.C. Burkness & T.L. Galvan, U of MN)

http://fruit.cfans.umn.edu/grapes/pest/grapeipmguide/appendixb

Suzanne Wold-Burkness, E.C. Burkness, and Tederson Galvan, Department of Entomology, University of Minnesota

The bumble flower beetle, Euphoria inda (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae), is found throughout most of the states east of the Rocky Mountains.  Their name comes from the fact that adult beetles may be mistaken for bumble bees (they fly close to the ground and emit a loud buzzing sound similar to that of a bumble bee). 

 

Bumble flower beetle within a grape cluster (E.C. Burkness & T.L. Galvan, U of MN)

Bumble flower beetle within a grape cluster (E.C. Burkness & T.L. Galvan, U of M

Adults are often observed at the sites of plant wounds and also on fermenting fruit.  Larvae develop in decaying organic matter.  Adult bumble flower beetles are approximately 1.3 cm in length, and have yellowish-brown or cinnamon-colored elytra with irregular longitudinal rows of small black spots.  The head and thorax are densely hairy, as is the underside of the body, the latter being covered with numerous white hairs.

Since bumble flower beetles feed primarily on fermenting fruit, specific control is usually not required or recommended.  Instead, control measures should be directed at eliminating the cause of the fermenting fruit.

References

Cranshaw, W.S.  Garden Insects of North America.  2004.  Princeton University Press.  pp. 672.

Roe, A. H.  2003.  Bumble Flower Beetle.  http://extension.usu.edu/files/publications/factsheet/88.pdf

 

 

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